Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Is It Alright to be a Feminist?

By Sreynet Chhem

This blog was developed as part of the Voices of Youth blogging internship assignment requirement. Views expressed here are those of the author's and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of UNICEF.

© Tyler Feder
Why is everyone hesitant  on being called a feminist?
Are you a man-hater if you are one?
What does feminism even mean?


These are some questions that I believe people have been asking themselves when hearing about feminism. Feminism, by definition, refers to the belief in social, political, and economic equality of both sexes. The term is  seen to derive after  three major waves of women's movements at various points  in  history to fight for equality.

The first wave, famously known as the ‘suffrage movement’, lasted from  the end of the 19th to  the beginning of the 20th century. It was established in four powerhouse nations including the US, UK, Canada and Netherlands to fight for women's rights to vote. Beginning in the 1960s and prolonged till the 90s in the United States, the uproar of the second wave was to fight for sexuality and reproductive rights.  The focus was also to push the passing of the Equal Rights Amendment to the Constitution, which guarantees social equality for both sexes. The third wave of the feminist movement emerged in the 1990s to address the critiques of feminism, as well as attempt to reach out to women of color, transgender women and sex workers. Despite these revolutionary highlights written down in gender studies handouts, "Feminism" is instead considered by some to be a harmful ideology due to longstanding misconceptions.

Why Can’t We Think We are Beautiful?

By Sophavatey Leak 

This blog was developed as part of the Voices of Youth blogging internship assignment requirement. Views expressed here are those of the author's and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of UNICEF.

Sad Heart” by pradeep_3

A few weeks ago, I went to the dentist with my sister, as she needed to get her teeth checked up. As I sat in the common area waiting for my sister, I saw a toddler running around the room and finding everything she came across fascinating. The toddler, however, came to a halt when she was in front of a mirror. She stopped and stared at her own reflection, admiring it for a good one minute. The little girl was around 3 years old and indeed she was very lovely with her pinkish and squishy cheeks.

This brought me to think about how we, as teenagers or adults, start to lose this sense of self-love as we grow up. Each day, we would wake up and look in the mirror. But instead of feeling good about ourselves like how we used to as a child, most of us notice all the little flaws on our face and hate every inch of it.

Every day, as we log in to our social media account, we would be bombarded by pictures of good-looking models posing and flaunting their “perfect” body. The media is playing an important role in shaping our thoughts and behaviors. It makes girls want to achieve the almost unattainable proportions like those poster girls. When in reality, the picture must have gone through heavy editing before it reaches the public.

Livelihood Down the Drain

By Monineath Bunyay

This blog was developed as part of the Voices of Youth blogging internship assignment requirement. Views expressed here are those of the author's and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of UNICEF.


Haim Ginott, a child psychologist, once said, ‘’Children are like wet cement. Whatever falls on them makes an impression.’’  For children living in the midst of war, they are taking the brunt of a war they did not ask to be a part of. And I believe their fast growing minds are the ones most damaged by war.
About three weeks ago, I came across ‘’This child is the cost of war in Syria’’ on social media. The video footage was so graphic, so touching that it brought me to tears. This little boy Omran, at an age of probably less than five years old, was sitting still in an ambulance, with dusty clothes and a bloodied face. At one point of the video, he gently touched the left-side of his face and looked at his hand. He wasn’t crying- instead, he had this neutral look on his face, showing how shocking the situation was for him.

Monday, September 26, 2016

Veasna Ky, Youth Inspired to Help Others

By Rathana Puth

This blog was developed as part of the Voices of Youth blogging internship assignment requirement. Views expressed here are those of the author's and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of UNICEF.


© Veasna Ky

“An inspiring person means someone who makes me feel like the work is fantastic, and also encourages me to do the same thing or something even better. When I get inspired by someone it gives me a lot of motivation and ideas on how to develop myself as well as help others," said Mr. Veasna Ky, who is working as a project officer on Health Education at the Khmer Youth Association (KYA). He is the youngest staff at KYA; he has been managing two projects related to Water and Sanitation and Non-formal Education.

Khmer Youth Association (KYA) has a lot of projects to work on the development sector. Their mission is to upgrade and promote the participation of young people in human rights, democracy, peacebuilding, health, gender equality, education and vocational training in Cambodia.

សំបុត្រមួយដែលប៉ានឹងគ្មានឱកាសអាន

ដោយ​​ វ័ន្ត ច័ន្ទមករា

អត្ថបទប្លក់នេះត្រូវបានសរសេរឡើងជាផ្នែកនៃលក្ខខណ្ឌតម្រូវការងាររបស់កម្មសិក្សាជំនាញសរសេរប្លក់ក្នុងនៃកម្មវិធី​សំទ្បេងយុវជន។ ការបញ្ចេញមតិនៅទីនេះគឺជាការយល់ឃើញរបស់អ្នកសរសេរ និងមិនតំណាងឲ្យ ឬឆ្លុះបញ្ចាំងពីមតិ​របស់អង្គការយូនីសេហ្វឡើយ។


© Chanmakara Vorn 


ភ្នំពេញ, ថ្ងៃទី ១៥ មិថុនា ឆ្នាំ២០១៤

ជូន ចំពោះប៉ាជាពិសេស

ប៉ា…ខ្ញុំដឹងថាគ្មានម្តាយឪពុកណាដែលមិនចង់ឱ្យកូនល្អនោះទេ ប៉ុន្ដែពេលខ្លះកូនៗក៏ចង់ឱ្យគ្រួសារស្តាប់សំទ្បេងខ្លួនឯង ផងដែរ...

តាំងពីតូចមកអ្នកដែលខ្ញុំខ្លាចជាងគេគឺប៉ា។ ប៉ាជាអ្នកមានអំណាចទាំងកន្លែងធ្វើការ ទាំងនៅក្នុងផ្ទះ។ ប៉ាជាមនុស្សមាត់ធំៗ គឺចូលចិត្តនិយាយស្ដីគំរោះគំរើយ ហើយបើមិនត្រូវចិត្តទេ នោះប៉ានឹងស្រែកជេរតែម្ដង។ ខ្ញុំសង្កេតឃើញពេលខ្លះប៉ាហាក់បីដូចជាគ្មានហេតុផល ចង់ឱ្យតែគេធ្វើតាមចិត្តខ្លួនឯង។ ខ្ញុំឆ្ងល់តើហេតុអ្វីបានជាប៉ាស្រឡាញ់តែកូនប្រុស? ប៉ាដែរស្រឡាញ់ខ្ញុំទេ? ចុះហេតុអ្វីបានជាប៉ាចូលចិត្ដលើកដៃវាយដំខ្ញុំ ប្រើសម្ដីធំៗដាក់ខ្ញុំ? តើប៉ាចង់ឱ្យខ្ញុំល្អឬយ៉ាងណា? ចុះហេតុអ្វីបានជាប៉ាមិនប្រើវិធីសាស្ត្រសម្ដីទន់ភ្លន់ ឬក៏ប្រើពាក្យឱ្យល្អស្តាប់ជាងនេះបន្តិច?

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Case study: The Long Road to Juvenile Justice Reform in Cambodia

By Anne Breillat

The child in this photograph is an actor.
© UNICEF Cambodia/2015/Luis Barreto


The rights of Cambodian children recently took an important step forward.

The long-awaited draft juvenile justice law was approved by the National Assembly on 30 May 2016 and signed by the President of the Senate on behalf of the King on 14 July 2016. The law is the first measure of its kind to protect children in conflict with the law in Cambodia. It focuses on diversion as the proper response to alleged youth criminality rather than punishment, which is the current approach in a country that lacks a system tailored to the needs of children. The new law is expected to come into force in early 2017 and has the potential to change the life of Cambodian children in conflict with the law.

Young offenders who have committed minor offenses such as theft or drug use are currently tried as adults and often face prison time in areas shared with adults. Many of these children struggle to return to normal life. They may be stigmatized or face discrimination after returning home. This often leads to a break with their family and community and to a dangerous life living on the streets.

In 2015, eight in every 100,000 Cambodian children were incarcerated.

Monday, September 19, 2016

Q&A on the newly adopted Juvenile Justice Law in Cambodia

©UNICEF Cambodia/2015/Luis Barreto

Cambodia has taken an important step towards realizing the rights of children in conflict with the law by adopting a long-awaited new legislation that focuses on ‘diversion’ rather than punishment. In this quick Q&A we explain the new direction this law will be introducing in the country in the area of juvenile justice and what this means for children.

The new law was signed by Royal Proclamation on 14 July 2016 and comes into force six months after dissemination, which is likely to be in early January 2017.

Monday, September 12, 2016

Volunteers who link remote villagers to health services

By Bunly Meas


Leangkim Theng (right) and another health volunteer discuss maternal
and newborn health with a UNICEF health officer.
 ©UNICEF Cambodia/2016/Bunly Meas



On the day 55-year-old Leangkim Theng was selected as a village health volunteer, she was not sure she could do it.

The work required her to educate women on maternal and newborn health in Serei Sokha village of Kratie province. While she did not feel she had enough knowledge, she accepted the role and now, 20 years later, she is still in the job.

“What keeps me going is to help mothers to give birth safely with healthy children,” she said.

Mrs. Theng receives training from health officers at the Kantuot health centre and Kratie provincial health department. She is part of a UNICEF-supported initiative to encourage safe practices and prevention of maternal and neonatal tetanus.

One or two volunteers are selected from each village and periodically trained to be peer educators. They do not get a regular salary, but they receive a small amount of financial support to organize peer education session.   

Recently, health officers visited Mrs. Theng and asked her about what she had learnt.  

“How many times do women need a vaccination to avoid tetanus for their whole life?” they asked. “Five!” Mrs. Theng answered quickly. 

“And how do we take care of a newborn’s umbilical cord?” they continued.

Thursday, September 8, 2016

កំហុសអ្នកណា?

ដោយ​​ វ័ន្ត ច័ន្ទមករា

អត្ថបទប្លក់នេះត្រូវបានសរសេរឡើងជាផ្នែកនៃលក្ខខណ្ឌតម្រូវការងាររបស់កម្មសិក្សាជំនាញសរសេរប្លក់ក្នុងនៃកម្មវិធី​សំទ្បេងយុវជន។ ការបញ្ចេញមតិនៅទីនេះគឺជាការយល់ឃើញរបស់អ្នកសរសេរ និងមិនតំណាងឲ្យ ឬឆ្លុះបញ្ចាំងពីមតិ​របស់អង្គការយូនីសេហ្វឡើយ។

 

ង្គរវត្ត, សៀមរាបថ្ងៃសៅរ៍ ទី១១ ខែមិថុនា ឆ្នាំ២០១៦
ក្រោយពីព្រះភិរុណបានប្រោះព្រំផែនពសុធាជោកជាំមក...

ខ្ញុំនិងមិត្តភក្តិបានបន្តដំណើររបស់យើងចេញពីប្រាសាទអង្គរវត្តវិញ តែស្រាប់តែពេលដល់ច្រកចេញប្រាង្គទី១ខ្ញុំបានពើបប្រទះនឹងទិដ្ឋភាពគួរឱ្យប្រេះបេះដូងមួយ...
នៅកៀនទ្វារមានក្មេងប្រុសតូចម្នាក់អាយុខ្ទង់៦ ៧ឆ្នាំ កំពុងអង្គុយចាំសុំទានភ្ញៀវទេសចរ។ គាត់គ្មានអាវពាក់ទេ តែមានខោកញ្ចាស់មួយជាប់ខ្លួន ហើយក្នុងដៃមានឱបទារកម្នាក់ដែលត្រូវបានរុំដណ្ដប់ដោយក្រមាដាច់រហែកមួយស្ទើរតែលេចខ្លួនចេញមកវិញ។ រាងកាយទារកនោះឡើងក្រហមរងាល ដែលខ្ញុំសន្និដ្ឋានថាទារកនេះទើបតែកើត។ ទារកនោះយំផង ស្រែកផងដោយសារតែសេចក្តីស្រេកឃ្លាន និងរងា។ ពេលឃើញដូចនេះ ខ្ញុំហាក់ដូចជាពិបាកភ្នែកមែនទែន ព្រោះមិនគួរណាក្មេងតូច និងទារកត្រូវរងទុក្ខបែបនេះទេ។ ខ្ញុំឈរមើលក្មេងនោះមួយស្របក់ ស្របពេលជាមួយគ្នានោះមានជនបរទេសពីរនាក់មកសួរក្មេងប្រុសនោះជាភាសាអង់គ្លេស ដូចនេះខ្ញុំក៏ជួយបកប្រែឱ្យគូសន្ទនា។

Wednesday, September 7, 2016

ការគាំទ្រសុខភាពចល័ត ផ្តល់សេវាសំខាន់ៗដល់ស្ត្រីនិងកុមារតាមសហគមន៍ដាច់ស្រយាល

ដោយ Iman Morooka

To read this post in English, please click here.


មណ្ឌល​សហគមន៍ ក្នុង​ភូមិ​ភ្នំ​កុកឡាក់ ជាកន្លែង​បុគ្គលិក​មណ្ឌលសុខភាព​ចុះផ្តល់
​សេវាសុខភាព​ចម្រុះ​ដល់​ប្រជាពលរដ្ឋ។

© UNICEF Canada/2016/Raab

ព្រលឹមស្រាងៗ ក្នុង​ភូមិ​ភ្នំកុកឡាក់ ដែល​ជាភូមិ​តូច​មួយ នៅ​ក្នុង​ខេត្ត​រតនគិរី នៅប៉ែកសាន​នៃ​ប្រទេស​កម្ពុជា មាន​កុមារ ស្ត្រីជាម្តាយ ស្រ្តី​មានផ្ទៃពោះ និង​ជីដូន​រាប់សិបនាក់ បាន​មកជួបជុំគ្នា ក្នុង​មណ្ឌល​សហគមន៍ ដែលជាផ្ទះឈើ​មាន​សរសរ​ផុត​ពីដី បែរ​មុខ​​ទៅ​រក​ទន្លេ​សេសាន។ ថ្ងៃនេះ គឺជា​ថ្ងៃ​មួយដ៏សំខាន់។ បុគ្គលិក​ជំនាញ មកពី​មណ្ឌល​សុខភាពដែល​នៅ​ជិត​បំផុត នឹង​មកដល់​បន្តិចទៀត ដើម្បី​ផ្តល់​សេវាសុខភាព​សាមញ្ញៗ ប៉ុន្តែ​មានសារៈសំខាន់ ដោយសារ​តែ​វា​ជា​ការផ្តល់​សេវា​ថែទាំចាំបាច់​ដល់​កសិករ ដែល​រស់នៅ​ក្នុង​សហគមន៍​ដាច់ស្រយាល​មួយ​នេះ។​

ភូមិ​ភ្នំ​កុក​ឡាក់ មាន​ប្រជាពលរដ្ឋ​ប្រមាណជា ៦០០នាក់ ភាគច្រើនជា​ក្រុម​ជនជាតិភាគតិច​ឡាវ។ ពួកគេ​ពឹងអាស្រ័យ​លើ​ការ​បង្កបង្កើនផល​ដំណាំ​នានាដូចជា សណ្តែក ស្រូវ និង​ដំឡូងមី សម្រាប់​ទ្រទ្រង់​ជីវភាព​រស់នៅ​។ ដោយសារតែ​ផ្លូវពិបាកនិង​ពុំ​មាន​មធ្យោបាយ​ធ្វើដំណើរ​សាធារណៈ​ដែល​មានតម្លៃ​សមរម្យ ធ្វើឲ្យ​ចំងាយ​ផ្លូវ​ប្រមាណជា ១៣គីឡូម៉ែត្រ រវាង​សហគមន៍​តូច​មួយ​​នេះទៅមណ្ឌលសុខភាព​ ក្លាយ​ជា​បញ្ហា​ប្រឈម​មួយសម្រាប់​ប្រជាពលរដ្ឋ​ជា​ច្រើន​គ្រួសារ។

ធ្វើឲ្យត្រឹមត្រូវតាំងពីដំបូង៖ ការប្រមូលភស្តុតាង ដើម្បីអនុវត្តកម្មវិធីអភិវឌ្ឍកុមារតូចឲ្យមានប្រសិទ្ធភាព

ដោយ Iman Morooka

To read this post in English, please click here.

នៅម៉ោង​ត្រឹមតែ ៦.៣០ ព្រឹកសោះ ប៉ុន្តែ​សមាជិក​​ក្រុម​ការងារ​គម្រោង​ “សុខភាពខ្ញុំ”  កំពុង​តែ​មមាញឹកញាប់ដៃ ដើម្បី​ត្រៀម​បំពេញ​ការងារ​របស់ពួកគេ​ក្នុង​ថ្ងៃនេះ។ ធ្វើដំណើរ​ចេញពី​ការិយាល័យ​របស់ខ្លួន​នៅ​រដ្ឋបាល​ជលផល ក្រុមការងារ​បាន​លើក​ឧបករណ៍​សម្ភារ និង​គ្រឿងផ្គត់ផ្គង់​នានា​របស់ខ្លួន ដាក់ចូល​រម៉ក​កង់បីរបស់ខ្លួន ដើម្បី​ធ្វើដំណើរ​ទៅ​ភូមិ ដែល​ពួកគេ​នឹង​ចំណាយ​ពេល​ពេញ​មួយ​ថ្ងៃ​ធ្វើការ​នៅ​ទីនោះ។

សមាជិក​ក្រុម​លើក​ឧបករណ៍​សម្ភារ​សម្រាប់​ចុះ​វាល ដាក់លើ​រម៉ក​កង់បី។
© 
UNICEF Cambodia/2016/ Iman Morooka

ក្រុម​ការងារ​មួយ ដែល​ដឹកនាំ​ដោយ​ លោកស្រី ឌី​ មឿនណារី ត្រូវ​ចុះទៅ​កាន់​ភូមិ ខ ឃុំ​ច្រាំងចំរេះ​២ ក្នុងរាជធានី​ភ្នំពេញ។ នៅ​​ពេល​ដែល​ពួកគេ​ទៅដល់ទីនេះ មាន​ម្តាយ និង​កូនៗ កំពុង​រង់ចាំ​ពួកគេ​ជាស្រេច។​

ក្រុម​ការងារ ដូចជា​ក្រុម​នេះ គឺជា​អ្នក​នៅជួរមុខគេ​នៃ​គម្រោង​រួម​គ្នា​ថ្មី មួយ​របស់​យូនីសេហ្វ វិទ្យាស្ថានស្រាវជ្រាវ​ដើម្បី​ការ​អភិវឌ្ឍ (IRD) និងរដ្ឋបាល​ជលផល ដើម្បី​ធ្វើការ​សិក្សា​ប្រៀបធៀប​លើ​កុមារនិង​ស្ត្រី​ដដែល ក្នុងរយៈពេល​៣ឆ្នាំ​។​ ពួកគេ​ធ្វើការ​ពិនិត្យតាមដាន​ស្ថានភាព​សុខភាព និង​អាហារូបត្ថម្ភ​របស់ស្រ្តីនិងកុមារ ហើយ​ប្រើប្រាស់​ទិន្នន័យ​នេះ ដើម្បី​កែសម្រួល​កម្មវិធីនានា ក្នុង​គោលបំណង​លើកកម្ពស់ការរស់រាន និង​ការអភិវឌ្ឍ​កុមារឲ្យ​កាន់​តែប្រសើរ​ជាងមុន។

Village members work together for healthier childhoods

By Pharin Khiev

Chanthan Yi watches her four-year-old son, Chanthea,
learn about warnings signs for pneumonia and sick newborns
© UNICEF Cambodia/2016/Pharin Khiev


It’s after lunch in Buy Sra village, a remote community in Cambodia’s rural Kampong Speu Province. A mother and her two sons, Chanthea and Sin Py, are seated under a thatched roof. Four-year-old Chanthea closely studies a leaflet with photographs depicting the warning signs of pneumonia and other dangerous illnesses that could put him or his new brother, who is just 3 months old, at risk. His mother, Chanthan Yi, looks on with pride.

About 20 families like Ms. Yi’s had spent the morning at a child health education session organized by the village health support group and the nearby Kroach Meas Health Centre. They received this important leaflet, designed by the National Centre for Health Promotion and UNICEF, along with other key messages and instructions about pneumonia and illness among children younger than 5.

Tuesday, September 6, 2016

The Reflection In the Mirror

By Monineath Bunyay

This blog was developed as part of the Voices of Youth blogging internship assignment requirement. Views expressed here are those of the author's and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of UNICEF.


tumblr_lw5jo0JrAx1r2hwq1o1_500.jpg
© chaos-nothingistrue/tumblr

The reflection in the mirror shows a beautiful girl
With big brown eyes and silky curls.
But she is afraid, depressed, confused,
For society indirectly tells her that she needs a ‘thinner’ body and a ‘prettier’ look,
Provoking her to live uncomfortably throughout the chapters of her own book.

To survive in such a judgemental weather,
Everyone and everything are simply nothing but pressure.
A glimpse of society becomes too treacherous.
Comparing herself with how ‘perfect’ others are,
She leaves her poor soul nothing but scars.

Be Yourself

By Rathana Puth

This blog was developed as part of the Voices of Youth blogging internship assignment requirement. Views expressed here are those of the author's and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of UNICEF.


© Rathana Puth

Although in Cambodia it is not a crime to be a person of the LGBT community, some people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender continue to face abuse and discrimination at home, at school, in the workplace and in the media everyday. Being gay is not a choice but it is a challenge. You have to face so many problems in your life. Today you might be facing bullies; tomorrow you might be facing violence. But all of these dangers do not stop me from being who I am. I am gay.

I have known that I was different since I was a kid, but I didn't know what ‘a gay’ was back then. As I got older, I started to figure it out but kept it hidden. My father is such a manly guy and he doesn’t really like gay people. He used to tell me not to be one of them, saying he would kill himself if I was gay. Those words deeply affected me. It made me become a person who lived ‘in the closet’. He did notice that I was kind of girly but he wouldn't ever call me gay because he believed that I would change. His hope made me lie to myself and everyone else by pretending that I was straight.

Great Inventions from Procrastination

By Sophavatey Leak 

This blog was developed as part of the Voices of Youth blogging internship assignment requirement. Views expressed here are those of the author's and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of UNICEF.


© Kucing Karen

Have you ever got a task to complete or a paper to write but decided to set it aside because you still had plenty of time in your hands? You instead spent that time on leisure activities such as playing games or watching your favorite show or drama. And before you knew it, the deadline was already approaching!

Of course, you then started to panic, stress skyrocketing as you rushed to get your work done. After barely finishing on time, you told yourself to stop procrastinating and start your work early the next time. But assignment after assignment you somehow always find yourself in the same situation all over again.

Open Letter to Youth of my Generation

By Sreynet Chhem

This blog was developed as part of the Voices of Youth blogging internship assignment requirement. Views expressed here are those of the author's and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of UNICEF.

Image courtesy of Vichaya Kiatying-Angsulee at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Dear youth of my generation,

As a youth myself, I can say there are many lessons to learn in order to grow. I may not be a foremost expert on life, but I’ve learnt quite a lot things that I’d like to share to people my age, especially those who are struggling right now.

Remind yourself that when you were given one life to see the world through those starry eyes, you are granted with every right and freedom. They’ve been attached to you since the day you came out of your mother's womb. Some of you may feel deflated by the small riches your family owns at the moment. But you should have this embedded in you: fortune can be sought at anytime while a father or mother who's sweated all these years can't be bought like a doll in the nearest convenience store.