Monday, December 12, 2016

Meet the face of UNICEF Cambodia: Early education intervention inspires goal to ‘change the world’

By Chansereypich Seng and Daniel Calderbank

Santepheap (child sitting second from the left) is pictured at a children and youth day event at his school
on 1 January 1988. The district chief (standing) was delivering his speech and the panel includes
the chief of the district office of education, the school director and a youth representative.
Photo provided by Santepheap Heng
 

Seventy years ago, UNICEF was founded to meet the desperate needs of children whose lives had been torn apart by World War II.

We started working in Cambodia in 1952 and established our first country office in 1973 at the height of the country’s civil war but had to cease operations in 1975 when the Khmer Rouge seized power.

After the fall of this regime in 1979, we returned to provide emergency assistance and address critical health, sanitation and aid distribution challenges.

Today, UNICEF Cambodia has a wider focus on the realization of children’s rights through cooperation with the government, NGOs, communities and development partners.

To celebrate our global 70th anniversary, we have compiled inspirational stories that focus on Cambodians who have been assisted by UNICEF to overcome personal hardship and become role models for others. 

Friday, December 9, 2016

Vanek’s journey from poverty to empowerment

By Chansereypich Seng and Daniel Calderbank

Vanek is pictured (second from left) with his with family in 1988 in front of the Preynob
Pagoda in
Sihanoukville province. (Photo provided by Vanek Lem)

Seventy years ago, UNICEF was founded to meet the desperate needs of children whose lives had been torn apart by World War II.

UNICEF started working in Cambodia in 1952 and established its first country office in 1973 at the height of the country’s civil war but had to cease operations in 1975 when the Khmer Rouge seized power. 

After the fall of this regime in 1979, we returned to provide emergency assistance and address critical health, sanitation and aid distribution challenges. 

Today, UNICEF Cambodia has a wider focus on the realization of children’s rights through cooperation with the government, NGOs, communities and development partners. 

To celebrate our global 70th anniversary, we have compiled inspirational stories that focus on Cambodians who have been assisted by UNICEF to overcome personal hardship and become role models for others.  

UNICEF staff member’s incredible journey of spirit, survival and success

By Iman Morooka and Daniel Calderbank

Path Heang pictured at UNICEF country office premises in Phnom Penh 
©UNICEF Cambodia/2016/Chansereypich Seng

PHNOM PENH, Cambodia, 9 December 2016: Seventy years ago, UNICEF was founded to meet the desperate needs of children whose lives had been torn apart by World War II.

UNICEF started working in Cambodia in 1952 and established its first country office in 1973 at the height of the country’s civil war but had to cease operations in 1975 when the Khmer Rouge seized power.

After the fall of this regime in 1979, UNICEF returned to Cambodia to provide emergency assistance and address critical health, sanitation and aid distribution challenges.

Today, UNICEF Cambodia has a wider focus on the realization of children’s rights through cooperation with the government, NGOs, communities and development partners.

On the occasion of UNICEF’s 70th anniversary, we interviewed our colleague Path Heang, Chief of UNICEF Cambodia’s Phnom Penh Zone Office, to hear about his family’s incredible journey of survival, loss and resilience during the turmoil of the Cambodian civil war years and the aftermath of this conflict.

Tuesday, November 29, 2016

Hope for a child living with HIV

By Navy Kieng

Sampho (not his real name) reads his text book during class.
©UNICEF Cambodia/ 2016/Navy Kieng

Sampho*, 11, is a young boy living with HIV. Sampho’s parents died in 2010 and he now lives with his great grandparents and the family of his aunt in Cambodia’s north eastern Kratie province. There are 11 people in his family and they all depend on his aunt and uncle who are construction workers. The young boy is in grade 5 at a local primary school near his home.

Sampho is a happy boy who does well in school. “I want to be a medical doctor,” he said.

“He is a good student, intelligent, brave and friendly,” his teacher, Ms. Tep Thida, said.

Once each month, Sampho goes to the provincial hospital with his grandmother or his aunt for regular medical follow up and to receive antiretroviral (ARV) drugs.

UNICEF provides support for transport costs and he regularly joins the activities of Friends Helping Friends, known as ‘mmm’ meetings for health education and consultations. When he is waiting for his appointment and treatment at the hospital, Sampho enjoys reading books and playing with toys in the hospital’s playground, which is also sponsored by UNICEF.

Friday, November 18, 2016

Cambodian teenager defies disability and campaigns for a better world

By Chansereypich Seng


Sokim addresses the audience at the Krousar Thmey foundation’s ‘Theory of Change’
workshop held in Siem Reap recently.
Photo supplied by Veasna Kya

On the 20 November annually, the world celebrates Universal Day of Children – the anniversary of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child and a day specifically dedicated to children across the globe.

To mark this special yearly event, UNICEF Cambodia would like to introduce you to Seamsokim So, an intelligent and optimistic student who has made great progress in his personal and academic life despite the loss of his sight.

Nineteen year-old Sokim is a grade 10 student who attends the Krousar Thmey foundation – a non-profit organization that provides care for underprivileged children – and Hun Sen Phnom Penh Thmey High School in Phnom Penh.

He is also a Krousar Thmey representative for UNICEF Cambodia’s Youth Representative Group.
In this role, he works with other young people to give adolescents a voice in their collective campaign to prevent violence against children.

Thursday, November 17, 2016

Young empowering the young and advancing children’s rights

By Chansereypich Seng

Cambodian youth are mobilising to eliminate violence against children (VAC) through inspired initiatives.

One such committed supporter for this cause is 23 year-old Sreynich Seng who recently graduated from the Royal University of Law and Economics in Phnom Penh with a major in International Relations. This follows on from her bachelor degree in English instruction at the Cambodia Mekong University, also in the capital city.

Armed with her solid academic background and as a member of the youth representative group working with UNICEF on the topic of ending violence against children, Sreynich is an eloquent advocate with a wealth of knowledge and experience for someone so young.

Sreynich during training with UNICEF Cambodia
Photo supplied by Sreynich

Wednesday, November 16, 2016

UNICEF and Cambodian government staff reflect on programmes for children through joint field visits

By Iman Morooka


At the de-briefing session on day of the joint field monitoring visit where all the groups gathered in Kampong Cham province to share their observations and recommendations. The meeting was chaired by H.E. Mr. Say Siphonn, Ministry of Social Affairs, Veterans and Youth Rehabilitation, H.E. Mr. Try Meng, Ministry of Rural Development, H.E. Prof. Oum Samol, Ministry of Health, and Ms. Debora Comini, UNICEF Cambodia Representative.
©UNICEF Cambodia/2016/Morooka

Phnom Penh, 16 November 2016 – Late last month, staff from various ministries within the Royal Government of Cambodia (RGC) and the UNICEF Cambodia Country Office conducted field visits across the country over a period of four days where they visited programme sites and met with local authorities and community members, as well as NGO partners.

This is our first year of implementing UNICEF Cambodia’s Country Programme 2016-2018 which emphasizes the importance of multi-sectoral collaboration and programme design in sectors such as health, nutrition, water and sanitation, education, and child protection and addressing issues in these areas which are related to the safety, welfare and development of children.

Tuesday, November 15, 2016

Combatting severe acute malnutrition in Phnom Penh’s vulnerable communities

By Pharin Kiev and Arnaud Laillou

15-month-old Yin Seiha, in the arms of her mother Sok Chea, is recovering from severe acute malnutrition after undergoing a treatment regimen using ready-to-use therapeutic food in the form of nutritional wafers
©UNICEF Cambodia/2016/Kiev

October 2016, Phnom Penh
- Seiha is 15 months old. She lives with her mother Chea Sok in a single room hut that floats on Phnom Penh’s Tonle Sap River, in one of the capital city’s slum communities. Smiling and playing with her one-year-old neighbor, it’s hard to believe that this is the same child that a month ago was struggling to live and in need of urgent treatment.

Luckily, the young child caught the attention of a local village health volunteer, Sothea Teth, whose role is to identify malnourished children in the community and refer them to services, in addition to following up with women and children who are at risk of becoming malnourished and could benefit from available support.

Sothea met with Seiha’s mother and urged her to take her daughter to be checked by the nearby health centre staff during a nutrition screening session conducted by the Ministry of Health, with UNICEF support. The baby had been frequently sick, suffering from fevers and regular diarrhea. “As the volunteer, I know many families with malnourished children,” Sothea says. “Visiting families at their home enables me to refer them to outreach services when they are offered at the village or to services at the health centre and hospital.”

Friday, November 11, 2016

Flushing away health risks

By Sopharo Oum

Man Chanthou, 19, stands next to a newly constructed borehole that provides clean water for
pre-school children in Kouk village, Rattanakiri province.
©UNICEF Cambodia/2016/Oum

Rattanakiri Province, Cambodia, October 2016 – A sanitation awareness initiative taking place in north eastern Cambodia is providing positive results in terms of increased hygiene, disease prevention and improved safety standards.

Sanitation is a key factor affecting children’s nutrition and health status. Progress has been made in recent years in reducing the number of people practicing open defecation in the country. In 1990, 89 per cent of Cambodians did not use toilets. By 2015, the rate had gone down to 47 per cent. However, despite this progress, the rates of people without access to improved sanitation remain relatively high in Cambodia compared to other countries in the region. The number of children who are stunted, or too short for their age, is also high at 32 per cent, or one in three children.

Monday, November 7, 2016

Volleyball for All

By Chansereypich Seng

Students proudly display the tournament poster
©Ben Evolu

One humid afternoon in late September, students were seen playing volleyball enthusiastically at Lycée Descartes – the French school in Phnom Penh. Extraordinarily, as well as calling out to each other, the players were communicating using sign language.

Around 80 students, both with and without disabilities, were divided into 12 teams and competed in Cambodia’s first-ever ‘Volleyball Inclusive Tournament’. Most of the students were between 15 and 18 years old and represented Lycée Descartes, the Toutes à l’Ecole organization and the Krousar Thmey Foundation.

Each team had two months to prepare, and during training in July and August while they sharpened their volleyball skills, they learnt a bit of sign language at the same time.

Friday, November 4, 2016

Nutrition Efforts to Build Brighter Futures for Mothers and Babies

By Noémi de Verneuil and Arnaud Laillou

Nanja and Niag answer the data collector’s questions
©UNICEF Cambodia/2016/Verneuil

Ratanakiri and Phnom Penh, Cambodia, November 2016 – It is early morning in Ka Lay 2 village and 28-year-old Nanja arrives at the meeting point with her husband Niag and their three-month-old boy Syna.

The baby, their third child, looks healthy and energetic and looks at everything around him. Nanja is here to do a follow-up on her health and that of her baby. The visit is part of the project called ‘Sokapheap Knhom’, which means “my health” in Khmer.

This project is an innovative joint development involving UNICEF, IRD (Institut de Recherche pour le Développement or French Research Institute for Development) and the Cambodian Government’s Department of Fisheries.

They are collectively involved in a study of more than 4,000 children and pregnant women in Kratie, Ratanakiri and Phnom Penh provinces which involves monitoring their health, nutrition and water/sanitation access. From this study, UNICEF with its local partners will adjust programmes to improve the survival rate and development of children.

Tuesday, November 1, 2016

Interventions That Save Lives in Remote Provinces

By Pauline Yongeun Ahn

Ms. Hul Savy (36 years old, pictured with her two month old baby) 
delivered her fifth baby at home in Intra Chey island 
in Beoung Char Commune, 33 km away from Kratie town
© UNICEF Cambodia/2016/Ahn

Kratie province, Cambodia: Regular health checks during pregnancy and soon after birth are essential to the health and wellbeing of mothers and babies. But many women in Cambodia continue to face obstacles that can have devastating effects. In remote villages and towns, women struggle to care for their young children and earn enough money to survive. Pregnancy adds another layer of burden to this struggle.

Many poor women find it impossible to pay for transport to a health centre, and the long distances they have to travel mean they do not have regular antenatal and postnatal check ups.

Seeing the level of need in hard-to-reach villages, UNICEF has launched outreach services in Kratie province in northeastern Cambodia, and now supports health centre staff to travel around the province taking health care to the people.

For the women of Intra Chey Island in Kratie province, UNICEF’s outreach programme is bridging the gap between them and life-saving health services.

Intra Chey Island is in Beoung Char commune, Sambo district. It takes one hour by road and a further two hours by boat from Kratie town. The US$110 cost of the return boat ride far exceeds a whole month’s salary for an average household, with most people here making a living through subsistence farming or fishing.

Friday, October 28, 2016

នេះជាផ្នែកមួយនៃ«ខ្ញុំ»

ដោយ វ័ន្ត ច័ន្ទមករា

អត្ថបទប្លក់នេះត្រូវបានសរសេរឡើងជាផ្នែកនៃលក្ខខណ្ឌតម្រូវការងាររបស់កម្មសិក្សាជំនាញសរសេរប្លក់ក្នុងនៃកម្មវិធី​សំទ្បេងយុវជន។ ការបញ្ចេញមតិនៅទីនេះគឺជាការយល់ឃើញរបស់អ្នកសរសេរ និងមិនតំណាងឲ្យ ឬឆ្លុះបញ្ចាំងពីមតិ​របស់អង្គការយូនីសេហ្វឡើយ។



«ថ្ងៃដែលខ្ញុំបន់ឲ្យមកដល់នោះ ឥឡូវបានក្លាយជាការពិតហើយ! ៧សប្ដាហ៍នៃការហ្វឹកហាត់សរសេរដូចជាយូរមែនទែន ពីព្រោះខ្ញុំធុញថប់នឹងតម្រូវការឲ្យសរសេរអត្ថបទជារៀងរាល់អាទិត្យ និងការកែតម្រូវចុះឡើង។ »

ពេលខ្ញុំឃើញការផ្សព្វផ្សាយពីកម្មវិធីនេះដំបូង ខ្ញុំមិនដឹងថាខ្ញុំរំភើបឬយ៉ាងណាទេ ស្រាប់ចុចអានភ្លាមតែម្ដង។ អ្វីដែលកាន់តែធ្វើឱ្យបេះដូងរបស់ខ្ញុំពុះកញ្ជ្រោលទៀតនោះ គឺខ្ញុំអាចសរសេរជាភាសាខ្មែរបាន ដោយសារតែខ្ញុំគិតថានេះពិតជាឱកាសពិសេសសម្រាប់ដកដាវ «ភាសាខ្មែរ» របស់ខ្ញុំមកដុសខាត់សំលៀងសម្រាប់បង្ហាញគេឯងហើយ។ Email ដំបូងរបស់សុរីតា អ្នកសម្របសម្រួលកម្មវិធីសរសេរប្លុកសំទ្បេងយុវជន (VoY) ធ្វើឱ្យមិត្តភក្តិខ្ញុំច្រណែន ពីព្រោះពួកគែមិនត្រូវបានជ្រើសរើសក្នុងកម្មវិធីនេះ [LOL] ។ សប្បាយដែរ! ព្រោះវាជាលើកទីមួយរបស់ខ្ញុំដែលបានជាប់ក្នុងកម្មវិធីស្ម័គ្រចិត្តនេះ។ ខ្ញុំបាន email ទាក់ទងបេក្ខជនជាប់ទាំងអស់ រហូតដល់ពេលដែលពួកយើងបានជួបគ្នាផ្ទាល់លើកដំបូង...

នៅពេលខ្ញុំបានទៅដល់ការិយាល័យរបស់ UNICEF ដំបូង ពួកយើងបានជួបជុំគ្នាផ្លាស់ប្ដូរយោបល់គ្នាទៅវិញទៅមកពីរឿងនេះរឿងនោះ ជាពិសេសយើងរកឃើញថាគ្មាននរណាម្នាក់ចូលចិត្តរឿងនយោបាយនោះទេ។ រហូតដល់ថ្ងៃជួបគ្នាចុងក្រោយដែលបានបងស្រីដារ័ត្នតី អ្នកសម្របសម្រួលកម្មវិធីម្នាក់ទៀត មកផ្ដែផ្ដាំឲ្យពួកយើងខិតខំសរសេរបន្ត និងកុំឱ្យខ្វល់ជាមួយ “haters” ។ បងស្រីនិយាយហើយ គាត់ក៏លាពួកយើង (ខ្ញុំវិញឡើងក្ដុកក្ដួលក្នុងឱរាដែរ)។

Thursday, October 27, 2016

New Experience: An Internship

By Monineath Bunyay

This blog was developed as part of the Voices of Youth blogging internship assignment requirement. Views expressed here are those of the author's and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of UNICEF.

#EXCITED Me and two of my awesome colleagues after our meeting. @UNICEF Cambodia
A new experience, especially something that has to do with work, isn’t much fun to me. Work could be fun sometimes, but as a sophomore in high school with tons of school work, maybe ‘fun’ isn’t the right word to describe the internship. To be honest, it is more like extra work, which means extra stress.  However, despite the stress I received during my period of internship, I also learned many things - from both my colleagues and the UNICEF communication officers.

I came across this Local Voices of Youth UNICEF internship about 3 months ago on the UNICEF Cambodia Facebook page. After I told my parents, just like many other parents in the world, they were glad that I was going to apply for it. In fact, they REALLY wanted me to try it out. At first glance, I saw ‘writing’, which is probably not the best thing I would choose to do. I could say that I’m not a fan of writing whatsoever. The next thing I saw was that the internship would start on August the 1st. That was when I started panicking because my sophomore school year was going to start on August the 2nd. So, this made me think, ‘’Okay, maybe not this time, I wouldn’t want to already start to die on my first week of school.’’ After that, I shutdown my computer and went to have dinner with my family.

I then told my parents that the internship starts a day before school starts but the response they gave me was, ‘’Do it anyways.’’ As a good and respectful daughter, I did it. In addition to my parents pushing me, I also knew that this internship would help me with my future scholarship and college applications. So, I submitted the application form, and wrote the mandatory essay with my free time.

I truly didn’t think that I would be chosen to be one of the interns but after a week, I received an email and it said, ‘’You have been selected as one of the 4 Local Voices of Youth blogging interns for the upcoming internship – congratulations!’’ Despite the fact that I would be facing extra work for the next 7 weeks, I was overjoyed. That was the start of “My first internship ever!’’

Final Bus Ride

By Sreynet Chem

This blog was developed as part of the Voices of Youth blogging internship assignment requirement. Views expressed here are those of the author's and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of UNICEF.

©Sreynet Chem

It's 12:56 in the afternoon on October 4th. The clock is ticking forward while I'm scribbling this final note as a Local Voices of Youth blogger. It's painstaking to let it sink in because why would one admit to let go of something she sewed herself into?

I remember turning up on the first day at the UNICEF office. I got lost! How typical. It's safe to say navigating is not my merit point from many experiences including this one. I find this embarrassing since there was a sign that read "UNICEF Cambodia" and I was too anxious inside to even notice  the sign right at the corner of my eye. It took me quite some time to reach the office. Thanks to anxiety, I was once again in another awkward situation with.. the security guard. It was as horrifying as it sounds. After sorting the tense moment, I walked into the office with my whole body trembling - just social anxiety things. First day of meeting new people was tough, but I really found myself in a position I’ve always wanted to be.

The internship was one of the greatest chances that came knocking on my door. I learned a lot of things on the first day. I learned that none of us like politics. Whenever any one of us brought up the topic, some of us would scrunch up our nose. Makara was the one who furrowed her brows the whole time or maybe it's just her normal expression. The best part of the day was that everyone was fueled with enthusiasm to share their perspectives on global issues. I could just sit there being myself and listen to them all day talking about what they believe to matter.

My Voices of Youth Internship

By Sophavatey Leak 

This blog was developed as part of the Voices of Youth blogging internship assignment requirement. Views expressed here are those of the author's and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of UNICEF.

©AdinaVoicu/CC0

I found out about the Local Voices of Youth blogging internship through a Facebook post that my friend shared. Without much thought, I decided to apply just two days before the deadline and was luckily accepted. My internship started back in August. At that time, I did not know what to expect, as I would not normally share my writings to my even closest friends or family members. The only people who got  to see my writings were teachers who graded my papers or exam.

Never have I ever thought that I would share my intimate thoughts with so many people.

But now that this internship is coming to an end, it means that I would have to write about my feelings and stuff again, which I am equally not as good as when I was writing my introductory post. *I panicked a little bit inside again hahah.*

Here are what I took away from this Local VOY internship.

Thankful

By Rathana Puth

This blog was developed as part of the Voices of Youth blogging internship assignment requirement. Views expressed here are those of the author's and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of UNICEF.

Cr. Drummstixx

This is my last blog post on thelocal Voices of Youth blogging internship. It has been a great experience for me. I have worked with a great team - we enjoy sharing our ideas and we are good friends. I have learnt a lot from this internship. I started writing about my life problems, and it changed my view about myself. In this past two months, I have develop my writing skill a lot.

My favorite post was my second post I think it was the first time that I opened up  about my life. After the second post, I received so many support from my friends and mostly online readers. That was such a wonderful moment for me and I can't be thankful enough for that.

In this last post I would like to thank UNICEF Cambodia for initiating the local  Voices of Youth and  letting me take this incredible journey for the past two months. For letting me express myself by putting my thoughts and feelings down on this blog. I never thought I'd have an opportunity like this. Also I'd like to give a big fat thanks to our editor in this internship. She help me so much on my writing skill. She's been giving me ideas on how to write better and even shared her own experience on blogging with us. I really appreciate  everything she did and I'm looking forward to work with her again.

Finally, I wanted to say that there is nothing we can't do. Sometimes you just need a little help.

អត់ទោស! តើអ្នកចេះភាសាខ្មែរទេ?

By Macara Vorn and Monineath Bunyay

This blog was developed as part of the Voices of Youth blogging internship assignment requirement. Views expressed here are those of the author's and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of UNICEF.


To my fellow young Cambodians,

NOTICE: If you’re good with our language, Khmer, then it’s cool. Just read this for fun, or for a bit of a reminder. For those who can’t properly speak our language, you guys are the targets. *wink* We decided to put together this post because we believe that globalization has impacted Khmer language, one of the most crucial parts of our country’s identity. -Macara and Monineath

Okay, yes, globalization is a great thing! The nations of the world get to connect and share ideas as we all work together to find goodness in this world. Even our t-shirts are results of economic globalization - with cotton that originated in China, sewed in Mexico with machines from Japan, and shipped with American ships to Cambodia. As the nations of the world, we just happen to need resources from one another to thrive. Cultural globalization made international films and songs available to our eyes and ears. Technological globalization is the reason why we have trendy smartphones in our hands; with those smartphones,  we have access to social media, where we can connect with people, whether near or far. Political globalization allows governments to work together to bring about world peace.

But there is one problem- an enormous one indeed. We, as Cambodians, are losing a sense of our identity. We are losing our language through this excessive foreign influences. Language is indeed a part of the Cambodian identity - it makes us stand out from the crowd.

Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Children and Mothers in Hard-to-Reach Communities Receive Essential Care

By Navy Kieng

The health centre midwife Chhim Ren provides antenatal care to Min Phath at Tmat Peoy village community centre 
©UNICEF Cambodia/2016/Kieng 

Min Phath, 27, is six months pregnant with her second child. She’s lying down on a colourful mattress under the thatched roof of Tmat Peoy’s community centre in Preah Vihear Province, northern Cambodia. A trained health midwife from the Takoeung Health Center gently examines her belly. Though this is Phath’s second pregnancy, this the first antenatal check up she’s ever had. The World Health Organization recommends a minimum of four antenatal care appointments to protect both the mother and child.

But this type of care has simply been out of Phath’s reach.

“Because of poverty, I have to work every day and have no time to go to the health centre,” she says. “It is too far.”

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

Just Keep Pushing On

By Rathana Puth

This blog was developed as part of the Voices of Youth blogging internship assignment requirement. Views expressed here are those of the author's and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of UNICEF.

©Eric Thomas

One day in the middle of a party I was sitting next to my dad, his wife, and her two children. My dad was drinking and I could tell he was drunk. At that time, my step brother was playing and talking so loud that everyone seemed to get annoyed by him, even myself. But I didn't say anything because I knew that was how kids play. But my dad wasn't a patient person, so he shouted at  the boy to stop playing. Finally he said, "You are not my son".

That sentence drove my attention towards my dad and the boy. We weren't really close but I felt really sorry for the boy. There was nothing I could do but watch, and from the look on his face, I could tell he was really upset and was about to cry. At that moment it reminded me of when I used to hear those words from my own mom and how it had hurt so much. And how I had to live in a difficult life after my parents’ divorce, how I had to deal with a lot of emotions running through my head and sometimes I wasn’t even sure how to keep myself strong.  

Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Helping vulnerable children and young people find hope again

By Sorita Heng

Young people receive electrical training at Mith Samlanh’s vocational training centre in Phnom Penh.
©Mith Samlanh/Cambodia/2016


Bona* was 14 years old when he left home in 2013 and joined thousands of other children living on the streets of Phnom Penh. 

Bona had run away from his home after his father, who was having an affair, became violent towards his mother. The night before Bona’s Grade 9 National Exam, his father not only beat up his mother but also his siblings, causing Bona to miss his exam the next day.

Soon after, his house caught fire and his parents got divorced. His father moved to Phnom Penh and his mother moved to her sister’s house. Ashamed by his family and depressed, Bona took a bus to Phnom Penh.

“I was very young then and I had no idea where to look for jobs,” Bona said. “So I went straight to the Riverside. I managed to feed myself with money that was left over from when I had come to Phnom Penh. But when it got dark, I was pretty scared,” he added.

Friday, October 14, 2016

A Story of Hope

By Sreynet Chhem

This blog was developed as part of the Voices of Youth blogging internship assignment requirement. Views expressed here are those of the author's and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of UNICEF.


© Spiral Art

Anyone who sits on cold pavement next to a loud coffee shop is old. That's what I assume. It is because the energy used up all these years does not do any good for the numerous getting up's and the sitting down's, so they have to sit in one place if they were to beg.
I sit on the pavement and watch cars chasing around for a good one hour. In a night where the chill crushes against the skin of every species strolling down the street, there is a little girl sitting on the pavement alone in the darkest night of September. From her chapped lips, I suppose she's been out here in the cold for more than five hours. She is holding a microphone to her heart. I look into her chocolate doe eyes. They remind me of every soothing thing I’ve ever laid my eyes upon in the world.  Her gaze is roaming the street in search for an audience who's willing to hear her. To make the sky her backdrop and the city her stage. This 12-year-old girl sitting next to me, I can hear her thoughts pumping loudly along with her heartbeat. She's only 12 years old and she's been dreaming of becoming a singer.

យុវជន និងការច្នៃប្រឌិត

ដោយ​​ ល័ក្ខ សុផាវត្តី

អត្ថបទប្លក់នេះត្រូវបានសរសេរឡើងជាផ្នែកនៃលក្ខខណ្ឌតម្រូវការងាររបស់កម្មសិក្សាជំនាញសរសេរប្លក់ក្នុងនៃកម្មវិធី​សំទ្បេងយុវជន។ ការបញ្ចេញមតិនៅទីនេះគឺជាការយល់ឃើញរបស់អ្នកសរសេរ និងមិនតំណាងឲ្យ ឬឆ្លុះបញ្ចាំងពីមតិ​របស់អង្គការយូនីសេហ្វឡើយ។


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© Em Chanithykol


នាងខ្ញុំបានជួប​ ឯម ចន្ទ័រិទ្ធិកុរ​ ដំបូងតាមរយៈការចូលរួមកម្មវិធី SEALNET Youth Leadership Summit 2016​ កាលពីខែមិថុនានៅប្រទេសសិង្ហបូរី។​ សព្វថ្ងៃកុរមានអាយុម្ភៃឆ្នាំ​ និងជាយុវជនម្នាក់ដែលមានការច្នៃប្រឌិតខ្ពស់។ បច្ចុប្បន្នកុរបានបង្កើតផលិតផល DoyDoy​ ដែលជាប្រដាប់ក្មេងលេងធ្វើឡើងដោយម៉ាសីុនបោះពុម្ព3D​ បន្ទាប់ពីទទួលបានការបណ្តុះបណ្តាលក្នុងវគ្គជំនាញខ្លីលើការច្នៃផលិតផលដោយប្រើប្រាស់បច្ចេកវិទ្យាទំនើបដូចជា អេឡិចត្រូនិច គ្រឿងយន្ត និងការបោះពុម្ព3D​របស់កម្មវិធី Think Global Make Local នៃUSAID។ DoyDoy គឺ​ជាល្បែងទុយោសាងសង់សម្រាប់កុមារដែលមានអាយុ ៥ឆ្នាំឡើង។     វាក៏សាកសមសម្រាប់និស្សិតផ្នែកវិស្វកម្មសំណង់ស៊ីវិល ស្ថាបត្យកម្ម រួមទាំងយុវវ័យទូទៅផងដែរ។ ក្នុងប្រអប់ DoyDoy​ មួយមានទុយោវែង ៥០ និងទុយោខ្លី ៣០ ដែលមានពណ៌ចម្រុះ និងសន្លាក់ជ័រចំនួន ២៥ ដែលបង្កើតឡើងពីការបោះពុម្ព 3D និងជាផលិតផលមិនប៉ះពាល់ដល់បរិស្ថាន ព្រោះវាជាប្លាស្ទិចពោត។

ខ្ញុំក៏បានចូលខ្លួនជួបសម្ភាសន៍ជាមួយកុរ ដើម្បីសាកសួរបន្ថែម ពីចំណាប់អារម្មណ៍កុរ   ក្នុងនាមជាសហគ្រិនវ័យក្មេងមួយរូប។